The Unsung Heroes of GLE

“I know he thinks I don’t worry about him because I don’t show it, but I do.”

That statement says it all about a critical piece of most lineworkers’ lives: their wives. With National Wife Appreciation Day on Sunday, Sept. 15, we thought we’d share a little bit about what it’s like to be a lineworker’s wife.

Allison Worvey has been a wife to Troy, a GLE lineworker, for nine years on Oct. 10. She’s a mother to their two children, Madison (8) and Miles (5).

“They understand that he works hard for long hours to provide for his family. I hope they appreciate and remember it when they are older and hopefully it molds them into hard workers as well,” Allison states.

What she doesn’t say is that she is a role model herself. She’s a surgical nurse.

“Miles tells everyone he wants to be a lineman when he grows up, just like his dad. Madison shows more emotion and worry when her daddy is gone,” Allison says. The kids ask their mother daily when their dad is going to be home. Sometimes she can’t answer that question.

“The hardest part is when he has to miss a birthday or a holiday,” Allison adds, “but we adjust.”

It’s part of being a lineworker’s wife. Being strong and taking care of the household while the husband is out working a dangerous job in terrible conditions is something they live with. Allison experienced the worst of that last year when Troy was injured on the job. While all turned out fine, it was a scare that will stay with her and the children for probably the rest of Troy’s career.

“The best part is hearing the stories at the end of the day.” Allison adds. Her favorites are about members caring and showing appreciation for her husband and the other lineworkers. She confesses that it’s a sense of comfort to know there are people out there watching out for them.

Allison’s own efforts don’t go unnoticed.

“She’s truly a supportive wife. I don’t know what I’d do without her,” Troy stated. “I’m a lucky man.”